For the Beauty of the Earth

Voicing: SATB

Composer: Michael John Trotta

Categories: , Tags: , , SKU: HRMG2241

$3.10

For the Beauty of the Earth

This stunning setting of the traditional hymn is approachable enough to be learned by most choirs and compelling enough to engage choirs and listeners alike.

Chamber orch. score and parts are available

HRMG2241 Duration 3:30-5:00 depending on whether you use the optional introduction.

For the beauty of the earthFor the glory of the skiesFor the love which from our birthOver and around us liesOver and around us lies
‘Lord of all, to Thee we raiseThis our joyful hymn of praise
For the beauty of each hourOf the day and of the nightHill and vale and tree and flow’rSun and Moon and stars of lightSun and Moon and stars of light
‘Lord of all, to Thee we raiseThis our joyful hymn of praise
For the joy of human love (For the joy of love)Brother, sister, parent, child (Brother, sister, parent, child)Friends on earth (Friends on earth) and friends above (And friends above)For all gentle thoughts and mild (For all gentle thoughts and mild)For all gentle thoughts and mild
‘Lord of all, to Thee we raiseThis our joyful hymn (Our joyful hymn) of praise (Of praise)
For each perfect gift of ThineTo our race so freely givenGraces human (Given) and divine (Human and divine)Flow’rs of earth and buds of heav’nFlow’rs of earth and buds of heav’n
‘Lord of all, to Thee we raiseThis our joyful hymn (Our joyful hymn) of praise(This our joyful hymn) Our hymn of praise
In the spring of 1863, Folliott S. Pierpoint (b. Bath, Somerset, England, 1835; d. Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 1917) sat on a hilltop outside his native city of Bath, England, admiring the country view and the winding Avon River. Inspired by the view to think about God’s gifts in creation and in the church, Pierpont wrote this text. Pierpont was educated at Queen’s College, Cambridge, England, and periodically taught classics at Somersetshire College. But because he had received an inheritance, he did not need a regular teaching position and could afford the leisure of personal study and writing. His three volumes of poetry were collected in 1878; he contributed hymns to The Hymnal Noted (1852) and Lyra Eucharistica (1864).